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General

What is IPMVP?

Submitted by David Birdwell on Wed, 07/20/2016 - 2:34pm

IPMVP stands for International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol. It serves as a guide for best practices in measuring, estimating, and reporting savings from energy and water conservation projects. IPMVP provides the framework for transparently and reliably reporting savings as required by SB1096. For more information on IPMVP and a free copy of the guidelines, please visit http://evo-world.org/index.php?lang=en.

Our agency/institution already has a behavior-based energy management program in place; how do we request an exemption?

Submitted by David Birdwell on Wed, 07/20/2016 - 2:33pm

Agencies/institutions that have comprehensive behavior-based energy management programs in place, which were contracted before SB1096 was signed in 2012 are required to provide program descriptions and document successes using the appropriate forms. These forms can be obtained by emailing the State Energy Program Office at 20x2020@omes.ok.gov.

If our agency/institution decides to upgrade or purchase new equipment, is prior approval from the State Energy Program Office required?

Submitted by David Birdwell on Wed, 07/20/2016 - 2:32pm

Prior approval from the State Energy Program Office (SEPO) is not required for equipment upgrades or for the purchase of new equipment. However, we encourage agencies/institutions to contact SEPO to help ensure your project is adequately documented.

How are energy savings based on behavior management differentiated from savings already realized through equipment upgrades and other efficiencies?

Submitted by David Birdwell on Wed, 07/20/2016 - 2:31pm

The State Energy Program Office provides Project Exemption Forms for agencies/institutions to document existing programs that influence current energy usage. The Project Exemption Form can be obtained by emailing 20x2020@omes.ok.gov.

What’s an Energy Manager?

Submitted by David Birdwell on Wed, 07/20/2016 - 2:29pm

The Energy Manager is the day-to-day quarterback for the program. They are responsible for implementing the program and tracking its results, and as such, their duties vary widely. The Energy Manager works to educate building occupants and maintenance personnel on behavior-based conservation techniques. The Energy Manager is also responsible for entering utility data into the energy accounting software and tracking the agency’s/institution’s savings.

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