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Frequently Asked Questions - General

IPMVP stands for International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol. It serves as a guide for best practices in measuring, estimating, and reporting savings from energy and water conservation projects. IPMVP provides the framework for transparently and reliably reporting savings as required by SB1096. For more information on IPMVP and a free copy of the guidelines, please visit http://evo-world.org/index.php?lang=en.

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Agencies/institutions that have comprehensive behavior-based energy management programs in place, which were contracted before SB1096 was signed in 2012 are required to provide program descriptions and document successes using the appropriate forms. These forms can be obtained by emailing the State Energy Program Office at 20x2020@omes.ok.gov.

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SB1096 and statewide contract SW125 do not specify how savings are to be used. While investment in high-priority building efficiency projects is recommended, budgeting decisions must be made by each agency/institution.

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Prior approval from the State Energy Program Office (SEPO) is not required for equipment upgrades or for the purchase of new equipment. However, we encourage agencies/institutions to contact SEPO to help ensure your project is adequately documented.

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The State Energy Program Office provides Project Exemption Forms for agencies/institutions to document existing programs that influence current energy usage. The Project Exemption Form can be obtained by emailing 20x2020@omes.ok.gov.

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Each individual agency/institution sets the Energy Manager salary so that it fits within their current salary structure. The State Energy Program Office can provide agencies/institutions with salary ranges to consider in their salary setting process.

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The job description for the Energy Manager position can be obtained by emailing 20x2020@omes.ok.gov

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The Energy Manager is the day-to-day quarterback for the program. They are responsible for implementing the program and tracking its results, and as such, their duties vary widely. The Energy Manager works to educate building occupants and maintenance personnel on behavior-based conservation techniques. The Energy Manager is also responsible for entering utility data into the energy accounting software and tracking the agency’s/institution’s savings.

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No, the first phase of the program is strictly behavior based. There is no requirement to purchase metering equipment. The program will work with the equipment currently in place.

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Once a point of contact for an agency/institution is established, that individual will be contacted by the State Energy Program Office to discuss the EnergyCAP software and utility data information. If your agency/institution has already assigned an individual to this project, please email their contact information to 20x2020@omes.ok.gov so program information can be directed to them.

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An email containing the agency infrastructure forms will be delivered from the OMES address 20x2020@omes.ok.gov. The email will contain the subject line “20x2020: Your Agency Infrastructure Forms.”

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Agency infrastructure forms are used to accurately document each agency’s/institution’s building portfolio in the statewide energy accounting software. The information provided on these forms is also used to make initial recommendations regarding an agency’s/institution’s need for an Energy Manager position.

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All executive agencies and institutions within the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education and Oklahoma Technology Center Districts, as well as some additional state entities must participate. Contact the State Energy Program Office to discuss your particular situation.

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A template has been developed as part of the program. Each agency/institution can adapt the template to meet the needs and mission of their organization.

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Behavior-based energy management is the creation of long-term, sustainable cultural change within all parts of an organization. This result-orientated management style communicates policy-supported goals on a continual basis using a variety of methods as part of a coordinated strategic campaign. Goals are communicated to employees at all levels and, when appropriate, to customers and contractors. All employees are educated in ways to save energy through both personal actions (e.g., turning off lights, non-essential electronics, etc.) and organization led process changes (e.g., facility utilization strategies, improved maintenance strategies, etc.). Behavior-based energy management does not depend on or involve installation or replacement of lighting, HVAC equipment or computerized control systems. Furthermore, behavior-based energy management changes the way organizations do business and creates energy efficient business models that hold energy conservation as an important factor in decision making processes. A truly successful program creates a feedback loop within the organization which further increases participation, long-term success and efficiency in its practices.

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